Green Capital Residency
       
     
  Diatom IX    54 x 54 x 24cms diameter    Reclaimed bicycle wheel, wire, bootletops, tyre tube.     Photo by Duncan Simey   Diatoms are microscopic organisms - mainly sea-based, which are now sadly becoming endangered, yet essential to our survival. They produce over 35% of the world’s oxygen supply. Beautiful, primal structures hailing back to the Jurassic era, they are symbols of nature’s cyclical persistence, though threatened by man’s intervention.
       
     
  Diatom IV    1m diameter    Found and recycled materials    Photo by Duncan Simey
       
     
  Photo by Duncan Simey
       
     
Diatoms floating in Arnolfini Harbour, Bristol, Big Green Week, 2012.jpg
       
     
Diatoms floating in Arnolfini Harbour, Bristol, Big Green Week 2012.jpg
       
     
 The Diatoms have since been re-sited at different venues including the Art Pavilion lake, London for the Rubbish Art Project, London, 2012
       
     
  Diatom     Watercolours and ink on hand-made Wookey Hole paper
       
     
  Diatoms design    Watercolours on hand-made Wookey Hole paper
       
     
 Diatom made by child participant in family workshop
       
     
  Man Models himself on Earth, Earth on Heaven    Recycled steel, lead & wire    4.5 metres
       
     
Man models himself on Earth, Earth on Heaven 3.6m high recycled metal.jpg
       
     
Man models himself on Earth, Earth on Heaven detail.jpg
       
     
  Man models himself on Earth, Earth on Heaven. Photo by Max McClure @ Sidcot Arts
       
     
Green Capital Residency
       
     
Green Capital Residency

Fiona Campbell was selected, together with 7 other artists, to produce a series of eco artwork for Bristol’s Big Green Week, June 2011, in her role as a Green Capital Artist-in-Residence.

Working mainly from her studio in Cranmore, Fiona also set up a small studio space at the Create Centre, Bristol, to show the public the development of her work planned for the Green Festival. Visitors could see Fiona at work on certain days.

Fiona’s work for the Green Capital Residency related to her interest in primal forms, vitalism and nature’s cyclical persistence. Utilising found and recycled materials was an important aspect of the work. In addition to using discarded objects from her locality in Somerset, she incorporated things she retrieved near the Create Centre and around Bristol, such as discarded wool strewn on the bridge, wheels, hubs and tyres. The paint she used on some of the Diatoms was recycled. 'I like the combination of urban materials to suggest organic structures’. Fiona

A series of Diatoms made from recycled materials, were floated in the harbour by the Arnolfini for a fortnight in June, as site-responsive artworks. To coincide with this exhibit Fiona ran a ‘Family Mash Up’ drop-in workshop at the Arnolfini for participants to create their own colourful floating recycled sculptures, based on organic forms. From the workshop they could look down onto the harbour and get inspired by the floating diatoms.

Fiona’s sketchbooks were displayed in the Arnolfini Reading Room for the duration of her residency.

Inspired by a Taoist line, echoed in the title, Fiona created ‘Man Models himself on Earth, Earth on Heaven’. This piece reflects her interest in the network of threads weaving through all things. The stretching human form - reminiscent of a tree - emerges from woven, cocooned layers, reaching upwards to a higher level and our energy source. It represents the vital forces in nature and potential re-birth of humanity in a new, purer state. Connected to the earth, we have the potential for greatness if we respect the rest of nature.

The materials are very much part of the subject: reclaimed metals of the earth.




  Diatom IX    54 x 54 x 24cms diameter    Reclaimed bicycle wheel, wire, bootletops, tyre tube.     Photo by Duncan Simey   Diatoms are microscopic organisms - mainly sea-based, which are now sadly becoming endangered, yet essential to our survival. They produce over 35% of the world’s oxygen supply. Beautiful, primal structures hailing back to the Jurassic era, they are symbols of nature’s cyclical persistence, though threatened by man’s intervention.
       
     

Diatom IX

54 x 54 x 24cms diameter

Reclaimed bicycle wheel, wire, bootletops, tyre tube.

Photo by Duncan Simey

Diatoms are microscopic organisms - mainly sea-based, which are now sadly becoming endangered, yet essential to our survival. They produce over 35% of the world’s oxygen supply. Beautiful, primal structures hailing back to the Jurassic era, they are symbols of nature’s cyclical persistence, though threatened by man’s intervention.


  Diatom IV    1m diameter    Found and recycled materials    Photo by Duncan Simey
       
     

Diatom IV

1m diameter

Found and recycled materials

Photo by Duncan Simey

  Photo by Duncan Simey
       
     

Photo by Duncan Simey

Diatoms floating in Arnolfini Harbour, Bristol, Big Green Week, 2012.jpg
       
     
Diatoms floating in Arnolfini Harbour, Bristol, Big Green Week 2012.jpg
       
     
 The Diatoms have since been re-sited at different venues including the Art Pavilion lake, London for the Rubbish Art Project, London, 2012
       
     

The Diatoms have since been re-sited at different venues including the Art Pavilion lake, London for the Rubbish Art Project, London, 2012

  Diatom     Watercolours and ink on hand-made Wookey Hole paper
       
     

Diatom

Watercolours and ink on hand-made Wookey Hole paper


  Diatoms design    Watercolours on hand-made Wookey Hole paper
       
     

Diatoms design

Watercolours on hand-made Wookey Hole paper


 Diatom made by child participant in family workshop
       
     

Diatom made by child participant in family workshop

  Man Models himself on Earth, Earth on Heaven    Recycled steel, lead & wire    4.5 metres
       
     

Man Models himself on Earth, Earth on Heaven

Recycled steel, lead & wire

4.5 metres


Man models himself on Earth, Earth on Heaven 3.6m high recycled metal.jpg
       
     
Man models himself on Earth, Earth on Heaven detail.jpg
       
     
  Man models himself on Earth, Earth on Heaven. Photo by Max McClure @ Sidcot Arts
       
     

Man models himself on Earth, Earth on Heaven. Photo by Max McClure @ Sidcot Arts